Find Success & Spirituality as a Globe-trotting Rockstar!

Chrissy is always pushing boundaries with a freeform approach to her live singing, Chrissy, aka Bang Bang, has carved out her own performance style within the dance music scene. Singing freestyle alongside house and techno DJs from all over the world, Chrissy brings an all-encompassing energy to the stage, creating a live experience that captures music lovers’ hearts and minds alike. Classically trained, her music knowledge enables her to masterfully improvise alongside DJs, the result being a 'you had to be there', one-off interpretation which has seen the Australian-born singer perform in the US, Europe, Australia and the UK, where she currently resides. With new songs currently in production, Chrissy is set to release several tracks in the coming summer worldwide. In conjunction with her singing career, Chrissy runs an immersive events company, hosting parties for companies such as Red Bull, Resident Advisor and Diageo. Her musical events ease guests out of their day-to day comfort zone to incite genuine and exciting connection through immersive gameplay, the result being joyous experiences that are just as much fun as they are transformative. I've seen her perform and she truly is amazing. So without further ado, we will welcome Chrissy to the show.

Kylie

So I'm very excited today to have the very talented Chrissy Bray on the show. Chrissy has a very interesting career journey that she is going to share with us and she is live from London today, so welcome onto the show, Chrissy!

Chrissy

Thanks so much, Kylie, and thank you for the intro - I sound amazing! Thank you!

Kylie

You sound amazing - you are amazing! And I've heard you live too, so yeah, literally in every sense.

Chrissy

I'm going to record that and every night listen back to it and have some good dreams as a result. Get a massive ego boost ;-).

Kylie

What I love about you is your constant positivity, in your Facebook posts you're not afraid to shout out about awesomeness, which is a great quality.

Chrissy

Look, I really believe in sharing the love and putting positivity out there. And I love shouting out to my friends just randomly, positive vibes. Just because, especially at the moment, there's just a lot of negativity out there, and it's really easy to think that the world is sort of collapsing in on itself. I think social media is a great way to remind people that we love each other, and it's just one big love-in, we've just got to remember that, you know.

Kylie

We do. And it's so true, there are so many negative messages, and some people get very cynical about social as well--but I think when used well is an incredibly powerful tool. Cause we say that we've never been more connected but more alone and disconnected in other ways. But yet when social is used well we can spread compassion and love and empathy and positive energy. And I know you're someone who certainly does that via social and certainly by your live performances. So I was really particularly excited to get you on the show because you have a career unlike anybody else I know.  It is really, very literally, a rock star career. So, talk me through your career journey, like, how did it actually begin? What did you think you were going to be when you grew up, when you were just a little one?

Chrissy

Well, actually, I never had the thought in my head “I want to be a...”, I just was it from the moment I was born. So, from a really young age, I remember mum bought me this little plastic saxophone, and I went off all day, like she was like “I had no idea where you'd gone”, and I learned all the nursery rhymes. I taught them all to myself on this saxophone and came back to mum at the end of the day and sat her down and played the plastic saxophone.

Kylie

Gave her a live performance.

Chrissy

Yes the whole thing. And then she bought a piano, she wanted to learn how to play piano and she spent years’ sort of learning it, getting lessons and I just sort of sat down and played it. I taught myself. I was just naturally drawn to it. And then in primary school at lunch time, we used to get permission from our fantastic music teacher who I just loved. She'd let us go in there at lunch time and we would actually play records, like old sort of records to each other, 60s records. And we'd learn all the harmonies because, of course, that was the time of incredible harmonies. There were actually only six girls in my grade 6 and grade 7 year in primary school, which is crazy, but we were all really into music and we would sing together. And then I would write plays, I would write musical plays and – looking back, I'm like I can't believe I used to do this, but--I would get permission to put the plays on after our school assemblies, and I would put on these plays, these kind of slapstick comedies, I wrote my own songs, I wrote a song called “Christine wears her stack hat” and I would get my friends to be the chorus. And I just did these things and I never thought to myself, I want to put these plays on and write this music and do these things because I wanted to be standing in front of everyone and get their attention. It wasn't that. It was--I loved the music so much, it was just where I lived and then I wanted to share what I did. It wasn't premeditated. It was very organic and just exciting. It was exciting and I loved sharing it.

Kylie

Beyond the sharing authentically, I always joke it's like I script anyone that I have on this show because all these really successful people have this similar kind of theme to the way they live their lives and it's about living authentically and wanting to share and wanting to connect. So it's not coming from a “I just want to get cashed up” or “I just want to be a star”, or “I want massive amounts of attention”; it's coming from “I'm just so passionate about this, I have to do it and I have to share it”. And what I love about your story so far, is that you're saying you just knew, it wasn't a kind of conscious choice, it just was. So in some ways you can kind of say you're one of the lucky ones, because there are a lot of people who are still kind of “I don't know, I don't know, what should I do, right late into life they're still thinking, “What am I going to be when I grow up?” But also on the other hand, you didn't choose an easy path. Because I imagine to get cut-through in the industry that you're in must be extremely difficult. So you went on and, so what happened after school?

Chrissy

I got a music scholarship playing the cello, I studied music very intensely. And I learned a lot, but I was always very aware of the fact that as much as classical music taught me the intricacies of music, and I learned so much from doing that course, my pull has always been towards sort of electronic, pop, at that time it was pop music, so I finally, in grade 12, I asked for permission to switch from cello to voice, to study the voice. I had been singing in the choir anyway, I was part of the chorale and that sort of thing, so they knew I was a singer anyway and they said okay, look, you can do the singing and the cello at the same time and so off I went and focused more on the voice. And then when I went off to Uni. I then learned that there was this thing called a pop star and there was this thing called a celebrity; then it became a little bit more complicated because you're sharing from an honest space, but then your brain learns that it's this thing that is difficult and it's this thing that a lot of people want and all of a sudden, your sharing becomes loaded with all this other stuff, barriers. And as much as I love sharing, everyone has this part of them that's sensitive and fragile, and if you're putting your heart out there, and you feel like people could sort of step on it and say no, you can't be a singer because you're not one of the chosen ones - which I wasn't. You know, I auditioned for things and I was knocked back, and I auditioned for some of those reality shows singing and I was knocked back. Because I wasn't set up for that, I had never trained myself, and it is training, to be knocked back and to say “that's fine, that's not my spot, my spot's elsewhere”, I took it really hard. I auditioned for the conservatory. They had a commercial music course and actually, Tim Minchin helped train me for the audition. Tim has gone on to do some incredible things, write the music for Matilda and has his own amazing solo career as a comedian and performer, singer, songwriter. I just suddenly felt very cut, set adrift, sort of trying to navigate my way through, trying to understand - okay, I have this thing but I didn't know how to do this thing anymore because you're meant to get permission from people outside of you. All of a sudden it became - I need people who are in authority, who have the power, to give me permission to do what it is I love to do. And I didn't know what to do with that. So I diverted my attentions into film, into theatre, I went and got a Uni degree, did a double major in film and theatre. I loved film, I loved filming, it was successful, I started my own film company. I won some awards, but all the while bubbling underneath there was this passion, and there was almost a sadness, really, of knowing that whilst I loved my filming and everything, there was just this part of me that was just sitting underneath, just yearning and saying “what happened?” And then...

Kylie

Isn't that funny? I'm sure from the outside people seeing you winning those awards would have gone “she's there, she's made it”, but in fact when internally you're not really following your heart and not really connecting to who you are and what you wanted to do, it's not there. So the external validation, yeah it's fun and we can look to achieve these things but then they're kind of meaningless if they don't line up with who we are and what we really seek to find for happiness.

Chrissy

Absolutely. And you know, it's a difficult thing because—I think in Australia, it's a weird one. We're very encouraging, we're a happy nation but at the same time, there's this sort of thing where you're not say like Americans, they love to encourage, 'bigger is better', 'yeah, get out there', 'yeah, do your thing' and 'shine', and you know, and I think Australia has a funny relationship with that. Rather than sort of just doing my thing, I constantly looked outside of myself for cues as to how I should be and how I should live my life; okay, “don't be the loud girl, don't be the person who sticks out, fit in”. I mean, on the outside, people would say “Chrissy, you're a bloody liar, you've never been quiet, ever!” But I sort of squashed my true self, I diverted my attention, I guess. And then I moved from Perth to Sydney. And I started doing radio with Nova which was incredible. I was on air, doing the “Hey, I'm on the street corner with cans of Coke and free magazines, come and find me.” Which was an amazing time, And at the same time I was hosting karaoke, so I was having my singing outlet that way. My singing was sort of popping up here and there anyway. And then I got into television, radio led into television, I was doing a lot of warm up comedy. I found myself, it was quite random, but basically, a friend of mind heard me on radio, and I've always been into gearing people up, I love getting people excited, and it's funny how this all leads back into what I do as a singer today, but he said “I think you'd be fantastic coming and working on Ready, Steady, Cook, the television show, doing the warm up for it”. So basically, whenever you hear on the TV show everybody going “Ready, steady, cook, yeah!”, I'm the person that cues that, well I was at the time.

Kylie

What a claim to fame. Put that on your tombstone.

Chrissy

That led to other shows. I did Australia's Next Top Model, I did Australia's Biggest Loser, but the whole time I was doing these shows, all the other people who did them, and there was four guys in Australia who did it and I was very proud of being the only female who did warm up, but while I was doing it, I just used to find it terrifying. I found it really scary because I wasn't a comedian in the traditional sense of the word. The way I worked was I completely immersed myself in the audience and all of the comedy came out of our discussions. So I would say something, they would say something back and then I would have the funny quip. I would start the day off with absolutely no idea where it was going to go. I would literally be improvising for hours. But all the things I was doing, all the diversions I had on the way were actually leading me back to where I find myself now. So I learned how to freestyle, I learned how to improvise, I learned how to think in the moment, and be true to the moment, be really present and there for whatever was showing up. And in that learning I then found myself.  I was doing a little bit of singing here and there, and I was invited to sing at my friend's birthday party and just sing along with the DJs that were playing. And I would improvise, I'd sort of done a few things at house parties here and there, Bondi house parties, legendary parties.

Amazing times. I still remember the first time I did it. There was this rooftop party going on in Bondi. We snuck in - we weren't invited. We went up to the top and there were some DJs playing, and some MCs who were on the mic and I just sort of took the mic and had a crack. And I just started singing and making it up as I went along. The rush I had from it, it was just so intense and I was jumping up and down and I was in the zone and it was amazing. It lasted a few minutes and then they forced me to give the microphone back to them. They were like “Who are you? We don't know who you are, give us our microphone back.” But that sort of started something, and when I was invited to my friend's birthday party, I had the opportunity to sing with DJs for a few hours, so coming in, singing for half an hour, and again, this sort of improvising, being in the moment, coming up with ideas on the spot, being true to the audience, watching the audience, observing them and then feeding back like a loop almost, this beautiful, creative energy in the room that they were feeding me and then I would then feed back to them. And the energy in the room would just lift and lift and lift throughout the night and we'd just create this bubble of excitement and sweat - it was always very sweaty. And that's actually where I met my partner. So the group is the Bondi House DJs. My now partner, Rupert, we met through that, he was one of the DJs. And thus began a beautiful relationship both personally and musically. And we created We Go Bang Bang which is the current incarnation of my singing journey. How's that for a short answer?

Kylie

No, no! That's a great answer! You know, there are so many things I love about this story, but one in particular, is the piece that there were all those bits along the way, in some stages there is a sadness that you weren't maybe being true to your natural talents, the things that kind of lit you up from the inside, but then everything that you did taught you different lessons along the way to take you to where you're at now. And I think there are a lot of people who are sometimes like you know, I've heard people say to me kind of late in their career, “I found the area that I want to work in, I've always wanted to work in People and Culture and I finally got there when I was in my forties or fifties or thirties or whatever, I wish I'd got there earlier in life” But you wouldn't be who you were if you hadn't had that journey and learned those other skills along the way. So there is certainly so much merit in, you know the road in life is never straight, it's always a twisty, kind of turny, kind of journey or path that we take along the way. And as long as we take something from all of those different experiences, they can mould us into this fuller, rounder, more expert person. So say, if your career had been always about the cello and you had done the traditional thing and gone down that path, would you have all these other skills that help you become a more rounded person? Like what you were saying at the start of this interview, the energy that you even give out over social media, interestingly, maybe some of that was kind of honed--I'm sure it was always there but it kind of was really brought to the fore when you were doing stuff like warm ups. All of those different experiences have taken you to and create an energy to what you're doing now. So tell people, tell us more about We Go Bang Bang and some of the stuff that you guys, you and Rupert, are up to now.

Chrissy

Basically, we're doing festivals in Australia it was amazing. We've had this amazing ride. We had a residency at Beresford and everything was going amazingly well and then Rupert put a bit of a spanner in the works and said “Hey, let's go to London. Let's go on an adventure!” I'd never really considered living in London but I thought you know what, I love mixing it up, I like seeing—pulling a rabbit out of the hat so I was like Right, let's do this! So, we moved to London and it was a very confronting experience. Because in Australia, I sort of had, my path almost to a certain degree had laid itself out before me in terms of you know, I auditioned for Nova, I got that particular role, and then my friend said come and do this, and then this friend said come and do that, you know, things had always just occurred. I'd started building another business hosting corporate parties so that had sort of been building that as well in Sydney so the majority of my income was coming from hosting corporate events that I had created. I'd never had to pitch myself, I never had to advertise, I'd never really had the courage to put myself out there again, like, as I was saying, when I got rejected in the early days of my singing. I was terrified of rejection. Like, still now, I don't deal with it very well, but I've learned all these tools to just deal with it now which is amazing but what happened was we moved to London and all of a sudden, this path that had been sort of forming in front of me changed.

Kylie

You'd been established and you kind of started from ground zero again.

Chrissy

Ugh! It was so yucky! I was just like—oh wow. And the thing was that I came to realize later, was that my whole career I had relied on people outside of me to say “hey, that was really great, you were awesome, that was great”. And I was like, well, if they said that, then good, okay. I'm on to something. But it never came from me, do you know what I mean? So I would host these big events, big corporate events and I would have all these people coming up to me and they would be like “oh my god, that was amazing! I can't believe this happened! I can't believe that happened, oh wow, da-da-da-da!” And I would spy some guy...sort of sauntering off in the corner, maybe leaving early, you know, I wouldn't know what his circumstances were, but I would see that and I would think that he hated it, that didn't work. All these people would be like wow, and then I would be focusing on, I was very quick to pick up anything, anyone who hadn't had fun, or what that I perceived didn't have fun, I was very quick to pick up on it. So when  I moved to London I didn't have the tools, I hadn't learnt how to get the assurance from within myself and that in itself is a big journey of learning how to go within and say to yourself “I did really well, that was a great job, that was awesome”, even in situations where things are literally falling apart in front of you, to be in that scenario and to say you're doing your best, it’s all good, you can save this, and just to constantly be in a state of letting go so that you can be the best you can be. Because if you're constantly looking around for the guy who is sneaking out of the room, your attention is divided and you're like in the breeze. You can be pushed around so easily by these things you're perceiving. So I've now learned to let go of my mind, that critical brain, that judger, the constant judgement of this isn't enough, that wasn't good enough, instead to say, that was great, here's where you next time can probably tweak, but well done, you know?

Kylie

What a powerful lesson. At the end of the day, generally what limits us are the limits we put on ourselves and that's our lack of confidence or self-belief or constantly listening to the inner critic. And you know, because of evolution we all learnt to look out for, constantly be on alert for danger and now it's like danger to our ego. We're constantly looking, and it is easy when you're in situations say like early on in your career and you get, for some people, for me when I was in a corporate role, I was the star and you got that external validation and you rely on that external validation. And that's what feeds you and that's what feeds your ego but that is a really, really scary place to be, because if you are constantly basing your happiness on your external circumstances, to add to your point, you're in the breeze, you are completely out of control of your own happiness and your own success because it's so external to yourself. But when you can actually claim that and find it within yourself and generate that self-belief and quieten that inner critic then not only are you happier, but certainly you're better at what you're doing. Because yeah, if you're looking over your shoulder for the one person who is not loving your show, are you really giving your full self and all of your energy to all those people who really are genuinely loving it?

Chrissy

Exactly. And this is why I think a lot of people look at superstars, massive actors or singers or whomever who've made it; they're worth millions and everybody loves them, they're in the media all the time and then they might commit suicide or take so many drugs that they pass away. And everyone is always so shocked by that because you think - how could that happen? How could you have everything, so much admiration, so much love? We adored you, how could that happen? And it's because there is a whole internal world that's going on that needs to be nurtured 24-7. We as a society think and are trained to want everything outside of us, we always look outside. That's what we're doing, we're always like - this happened, and that happened, and the fact of the matter is, this is an internal journey. Being on this planet is actually all about going inwards and looking at yourself and noodling about and learning about yourself so that you can feel this sense of peace and joy that's always there within you, that can only be found by going within. If you are always looking for joy and peace outside of you, then it will just constantly come and go, you will constantly have these highs and lows.

Kylie

It's such a precarious kind of position to put yourself in but it's the way that most of us are brought up. You mentioned you have some tools for dealing with rejection and finding that self-belief. So how do you do that?

Chrissy

The big thing is—I mean, I've done a lot of reading, I've gone to a lot of seminars. I think one of the best books I've read is Eckhart Tolle's The Power of Now, in terms of understanding what being present means, and the importance of being present, trying to make that a part of your everyday life. Also meditation, taking time out each day for your brain, to just give your brain some quiet time and stillness. But a really big thing for me is coming to learn that there are two of you. There's your ego, your brain, it's got all these thoughts that are just constantly going, 24 hours a day, judgements, in constant state of judgement, that's good, that's bad, I like this, I don't like that...I sort of look at it as the human and the being. The human is your ego, your thoughts, going on all day. Your being is like your higher self. It's that feeling--you know when everything is going wrong and you say to yourself – I know this is going to be okay, I know underneath it all, everything is going to be okay. It's that underneath it all, it's that part of you that is connected to the higher self, it's the being of you, it's the oneness of humans, that we're all connected and everything is going to be okay. And that, those two things together make you human and a being. What I try to do is connect with my being as much as possible. Because the being for example, let's say I'm hosting this massive event and something horrible happens--my whole event is centered on a video and the video doesn't work. My human self freaks out. I might think “The whole show is over, everything is ruined, I spent six months on this”. My being knows that even if all those things are true, even if everything falls in on itself, I'm still okay, I'm still here, I'm still present. This moment in time, this disaster, this circumstance is just a blip in a much, much bigger picture, a picture that is way bigger than I am. It's a huge picture. It's so big that as a human being you can't even fathom how big and beautiful it is. And I go into that space, and in that space I breathe. I can have a laugh, I come back into my power and this sense of relaxation comes over me and all of a sudden, I see how to fix the video, or I come up with a fantastic speech instead of the video, or we all end up coming together and singing a song or something that's possibly even more incredible and exciting and beautiful than the video. And that's the thing that the being offers. The being part of you sees the infinite possibilities in every moment. Because we as human thing think A-B-C-D, and the being is like fuck the alphabet, let's look at all these other things. And those infinite opportunities are always there but our brains are very limiting. We see things through a pinhole. So what I tell myself is my brain is messing with me. It's constantly looking at things in a really small way. And instead I choose this bigness, this space. I choose to be in this space. And it takes a lot of practise. I get better and better and better at it, and I spend more and more time in the space. But quite often when I sort of explain this to people, they say well, you can't just turn off—it's your brain, you're operating from your brain. And yes, I am, you can't have the human without the being and you can't have the being without the human. We are both things at all times, but our society has trained us to be human 24-7, just to think about what's in front of us, the challenges, the difficulties, the judgements. Our brains—we go to school and we're taught – get this right, do not fail, do what the teacher says, be a good person...all these rules and regulations, yeah? Like, hit this bar, hit this target.

Kylie

And the overthinking as well is--like a thought that ruminates; it can be really destructive. Like you said, if you're thinking about the person that's leaving the room—I love it. There’s a Tibetan phrase, “water stirred is never clear”. So if you're just thinking, thinking, thinking, you never get clarity. So if you imagine a little lake and you're stirring up, or a puddle, and you're stirring up the mud, it's only when the mud settles that there's the clarity, and that's when you can have the connection or the insights, or just the purely being present. I have to say I am actually on a similar journey, and follow a similar philosophy. Tibetan Buddhism put it quite clearly and make that distinction between the true nature of mind and the appearance of mind. And the appearance of mind is the thoughts and distractions and the thinking and the fears and all that stuff that is just going on all the time. And the true nature of mind is the heart and it is infinite wisdom and compassion. And so that's the oneness and the connection to everyone and the love and then the insights and the beauty of being in the present. But yet to your point, it requires so much mind training to be able to get to that and sometimes we only get glimpses of that being. But I think the more you train your mind, you get more, from glimpses to moments to experiences to being. But it's a lot of work.

Chrissy

Absolutely, and we spend 12 years learning science, and all these different things, and we don't learn how to use our brain, the actual thing that's doing the learning. No one teaches us, you've got this crazy thing called the brain and it's going to mess with you most of your life...You're going to want all these things, but you don't actually want those things, you just want acceptance and gratitude. And the thing is, the the irony is that your real power is in the being. Your real power is when you do take that big deep breath and you just let go. And in that letting go, because hosting events is just a tricky thing, there's just so many variables going on at once, my best events, my best performances as a singer going back to my story of when we first moved to London and I had to start all over again and I had to learn how to give myself acknowledgement for the things I could do and to believe in myself. Going on that journey, it really enabled me to, because it’s a difficult journey. You find out the truth, you might read Eckhart Tolle's book about The Power of Now and you read all these amazing things and you're like—oh my god! Oh, I've arrived! I've seen the light! I get it now!

Kylie

It's hard to go from reading that to actually then being it.

Chrissy

Yay! You're like -Tick! Tick! I'm enlightened everyone, I'm enlightened, look at me! And then you've got this whole other, really even bigger journey to use it. You go Yay—oh Jesus. And then you're like- I'm on a different—I'm on a new path – you're like - Oh god this is as hard as the other one. But you're accessing a whole other world of acceptance and peace and joy and all those things. I'm just so grateful that the more I can tap into that, so like when I came to London and I had to pitch myself for the first time, and anyone will tell you, pitching yourself is horrible. You're like so, I'm really good at this, and um you need me. It's just icky. But if you go into that being part of you instead, rather than the thinking bit, and you say, and you go into this calmer space, instead of pitching yourself, you connect with the other person and you share your awesomeness. You share your gifts with them and you realise that you don't want to pitch yourself to get something, you want to share something with then so that everyone has a great time. The point of me wanting to sing somewhere, it's really easy to think I want to sing somewhere so I can earn some money. But the truth is, the person who gets up on stage and they're singing because they want to share something and create something, that is, I mean, those kind of moments, they are the moments that make you want to cry when you're part of it, when you're watching a show. You know when it's happening. It is a completely different feeling. Everyone can feel it. Everyone comes together into that space, and when you go into that space, you actually help people into that space as well and magic, magical things happen when you let them, when you just try, when you leave that little brain aside.

Kylie

We've actually just come full circle. We started all about sharing energy and sharing awesomeness, and have come right back to that. At the end of the day, it's about connecting to who you are, sharing your awesomeness and I suppose connecting to your natural talents, too. So you've connected with who you are and your natural capabilities and then the being, to bring it to the world in such an authentic and honest way.

Chrissy

You said earlier that I was lucky in that I always knew what I wanted to do. There was a time there when I honestly questioned that because it was painful, it was really painful. Because I really wanted to do this thing, and I honestly believed again because I thought everything was outside of myself, everyone else had to give me permission, that it was just a source of pain. I didn't know-- how do you become a sing—how do you make it as a singer? Do you go to the record company? Do you…there's no ladder. It’s not like okay, if you want to be an accountant, you go to Uni, apply for a job, you know, you don't...

Kylie

One and a half years here, do another degree, do something else, it's quite a linear path.

Chrissy

You can kind of sort of see your way through, but if you want to be a performer, there's no rule book for that and each person gets there in a completely different way. For each person, it looks like a completely different thing. Like where I'm at now, I'm about to do a whole lot of recording, releasing my music, which is really exciting, but at the same time, I've got my events company, my immersive events which has grown amazingly while I've been here. I'm really excited about these events that I do, and sort of going to expand it to possibly to America, and then build some things in Australia as well. If you keep staying in that space of constant expansion, then things that your brain might never have thought of start happening because you're coming from that powerful space. Yeah, easier said than done.

Kylie

Lucky but also a curse at the same time, but it sounds like you have absolutely connected to it and I’m so excited to hear that you're thriving over there in London as well. Now I'm conscious of time, and you've shared so much of your awesomeness with us. So what we'll need to do is in the show notes share a link so people can find you. I suppose maybe we can even include some of the things that you will be performing at and more about your companies and how they can connect with you.

Chrissy

Absolutely, absolutely. Yeah, I mean, in terms of the immersive events experience, we're now heading into a new era where people want to be taken on a journey, and want to in terms of their experiences together in terms of corporations, the way people work together, I see us entering a different era where people are expanding. You can feel it, like this amazing podcast that we're talking about today. There's a change that's going on. People are tapping into that side of themselves more and more and it's so exciting. It's so exciting. We're building amazing things together. Kylie, your podcast is a perfect example of that.

Kylie

Thanks love, I appreciate that. I agree, I suppose. I see it too, there's like these two parts of the world, there's the stuff that's going on in the UK and with Trump and then you have this whole other shift towards consciousness, and people, like even the fact that this is the Land Your Dream Job Podcast, and we're talking about spirituality and connectedness and immersion and authenticity. And this has just kind of been the natural evolution of this podcast. I've just got successful people on who're just nailing it in their given space and it all comes back to this.

Chrissy

Absolutely. And I think it's so easy in this the reality that we live in for people to think - no, I've got to try harder, and I've got to push more, and I've got to spend more time, and I've got to dedicate myself and I've got to try for this and try for that. And I think the reality is you can do that and you can get there that way and possibly burn out, or you can start on the path and you can go into this sort of this space and actually things unravel in a more organic way, things start popping up, you see different opportunities you wouldn't actually have seen if you weren't on this insane treadmill. So if you sort of open your eyes to the possibilities, different things pop up. And that's why I think a lot of successful people are on the spiritual path because in fact the spiritual path can actually lead to incredible success because you're connecting with something that's really powerful, and you're just chilling out. Even if you don't believe in the oneness of everything, you're actually breathing a little bit better, listening a little bit better, you know, connecting to others. You might be in a meeting and you go into that chilled out space, and then you might just be able to hear everyone a little bit better around you and therefore pull everyone together on this amazing new project, or who knows? So even if you don't believe in the woo woo spiritual part, I highly recommend just having a crack. And you know, invariably what happens is you end up believing in a lot of the oogie boogie stuff as well. But, either way, everybody wins.

Kylie

Thank you so much for being on the show, Chrissy, it's been such an absolute pleasure!

Wow. How awesome to have Chrissy on the show. She brings so much energy to everything that she does. Such a pleasure to have her on the show and so generous of her to share so much of her wisdom from her personal journey, and wow, what a journey she has been on in every sense of the word. So I would absolutely encourage you to connect with Chrissy, because I'm following her on Facebook - she's pretty funny, as well as sharing a lot of her energy and her performances. So firstly if you haven't subscribed to this site then absolutely do so. I can give you some more motivation and inspiration and you can check out lots more free content coming from me. And here are the links to Chrissy,

www.wegobangbang.com

https://www.facebook.com/wegobangbang/

www.chrissybray.com

So definitely follow her, jump on and subscribe to me and stay in contact even more. Thank you for joining us on the show today. As always, it’s an absolute pleasure to have you here and wishing you an amazing day, morning, evening, wherever you are in the world. Thank you for joining us.